Art-Cadre.com
the source of fine art
Home Fine Art Jean-Michel Folon Salvador Dali Paul Delvaux
Buy Art | Search Artist | You're Looking for | You're Selling
Cart Wishlist Accessories Services
Visit the Gallery's Collection
 Tue 11 Dec Make Art-Cadre.com  My Home Page Add Art-Cadre.com to My Favorites English VersionEN | FRFrench Version
Log In | Newsletter| Help
Search Fine Art
Advanced search
Find exactly what you're looking for

Keyword Search:
Type in an item number, artist name or word
search tips

TOP 10 Artists
1 DELVAUX Paul
2 MAGRITTE Rene
3 FOLON Jean-Michel
4 DALI Salvador
5 FINI Leonor
6 Man RAY
7 CARZOU Jean
8 BRASILIER Andre
9 ICART Louis
10 DANCHIN Leon
 
Media (1822)
Graphics [972]
Drawings [20]
Paintings [21]
Art Jewelry [2]
Ceramics [16]
Sculptures [66]
Posters [194]
Miscellaneous [2]
Philately [12]
Art Books [517]

Search
Artists
Artists A to Z
Style classification
Thematic classification
Artist Biography
Glossary
Selling Art
Looking for Art
Novelties
Promotions
Newsletter
Links
LinkExchange
Affiliates
Affiliates
Affiliates
All Artists A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
ADAMI Valerio
AGAM Yaacov
ALECHINSKY Pierre
ALTMAN Harold
ANDIVERO Antonio
ANTONIO
APPEL Karel
ARBARETAZ Jean-Louis
ARMAN Fernandez
AVATI Mario
BAJ Enrico
BELLMER Hans
BEN (Benjamin VAUTIER)
BERROCAL Miguel
BERTRAN Andre
BEZ Jacqueline
BLANPAIN Jean-Pierre
BOGAERT Gaston
BONNARD Pierre
BONNEFOIT Alain
BRASILIER Andre
BRAYER Yves
BRILLANT Gilou
BRISSON Pierre-Marie
BUFFET Bernard
BURY Pol
CALDER Alexander
CARCAN Rene
CARZOU Jean
CATHELIN Bernard
CAVALLE Salvador
CESAR
CHAGALL Marc
COIGNARD James
CULPEPPER Joseph
DALI Salvador
DANCHIN Leon
DAVID Jose
De CHIRICO Giorgio
de KOONING Willem
de SAINT PHALLE Niki
DEBERDT Francoise
DEBUTLER Jacqueline
DEFOSSEZ Alfred
DEGANS Xavier
DELACROIX Eugene
DELAUNAY Robert
DELAUNAY Sonia
DELPORTE Charles
DELUCA Peter
DELVAUX Paul
DINE Jim
DONADINI Jean-Paul
DUPONT Michel
DUSSAU Georges
ENSOR James
ERNST Max
FAYET Marie-Therese
FINI Leonor
FITREMANN Gerard
FLAMENG Francois
FOLON Jean-Michel
FORT Esteve
FOUJITA Leonard
FULLA Prim
GANNE Yves
GANTNER Bernard
GAVEAU Claude
GLASER Milton
GOCKEL Alfred
GOEZU Andre
GORODINE Alexis
GRANGER Michel
GREENHALF Robert
GRENIER Didier
GRIGOR Rachel Anne
GUIRAMAND Paul
HARING Keith
HARTUNG Hans
HASEGAWA Shoichi
HAUCK Bernd
HAUCK Norma C
HEBBELINCK Francis
HEBBELINCK Roger
HEINE Jean
HELENON Serge
HERGE
HILAIRE Camille
HILON France
HOSTALLERO Gary
HUNDERTWASSER Friedrich
HWANG Kyu-Baik
ICART Louis
IVANOV Alexander
JANSSEN Horst
JORDEN Robert
KHNOPFF Fernand
KITSLAAR Hans
KLEE Paul
KOLLWITZ Kathe
KRAMER Mireille
KUHN Volker
KWASNIEWSKA Barbara
LABISSE Felix
LANDUYT Octave
LAURENCIN Marie
LEGER Fernand
LICHTENSTEIN Roy
LINCKE Hartmut
LUBAROW Renee
LUCEBERT
MADUZAC
MAGRITTE Rene
Man RAY
MARA Pol
MARTIN Magdeleine
MASSON Andre
MIRO Joan
MOTHERWELL Robert
MUNCH Edvard
MUNOZ Lucio
NELLENS Roger
PANAMARENKO
PAPART Max
PARKER Karen
PEDERSEN Carl-Henning
PEYNET Raymond
PICASSO Pablo
PIERRON Georges
PIROTTE Suzanne
RAFFLEWSKI Rolf
RASSENFOSSE Armand
REMBRANDT
RIAB Boris
RICHMOND Sally
RIVERA Antonio
RIVERS Larry
ROBERT Laurent
RODO-BOULANGER Graciela
ROPS Felicien
SAINT CLAIR P
SCHLICHTHOLZ Jorg
SCHNEUER David
SOMVILLE Roger
SOULAGES Pierre
SPAHN Victor
STERN Bernard
SZYMKOWICZ Charles
TANNING Dorothea
TAPIES Antoni
TATAFIORE Ernesto
THOMA Pierre
TING Walasse
TINGUELY Jean
TOBIASSE Theo
TOFFOLI Louis
TOULOUSE LAUTREC
TREMOIS Pierre-Yves
UBAC Raoul
UNKNOWN - INCONNU
URDIN Kiro
VALADIE Jean-Baptiste
VAN DONGEN Kees
VASARELY Victor
VILLON Jacques
WALKER Anne
WANG C C
WARE Martin
WEISBUCH Claude
WESSELMANN Tom
WUNDERLICH Paul
X Files
YVARAL Jean-Pierre
ZADKINE Ossip
ZANETTI Claire
ZAO WOU-KI
Jean-Michel BASQUIAT
View this artist's available pieces here.
United States (USA)
1960 - 1988
Bad Painting
BASQUIAT Jean-Michel

Born in New York City to a Puerto Rican mother and Haitian father.
He grew up in Brooklyn and became a famous New York-based artist, known for his street paintings or graffiti in child-like style. His street pseudonym was SAMO, and he created a constantly changing vocabulary of symbolic marks and images for his paintings that reflected aspects of his own troubled life.

He attended the alternative High School in New York,on his own he energetically explored a wide range of imagery and influences, ranging from comic books to Egyptian hieroglyphics, from the works of Spanish artist Pablo Picasso to children's art.
Then he collaborated with Al Diaz, a graffiti artist. Throughout the early 1980s, he was an active member of the downtown New York club scene with other artists, musicians, and film makers. Impoverished, he painted on any available surface, doors, boxes, walls, etc. His first one man exhibition, held at the Annina Nosei Gallery, was a tremendous commercial and critical success.The start of Basquiat's swift and emotionally troubling rise to art-world stardom came in 1980, when he was selected by Colab, an artist's cooperative, for their Times Square Show. He painted a large interior wall for the exhibit, using both spray cans and brushes. Basquiat was adored by the wealthy downtown art establishment, which promoted what it believed was primitive genius, though some critics believed he was exploited. New York artists such as Keith Haring and Kenny Sharf, both of whom were keenly interested in integrating so-called street art influences into their work, also admired Basquiat. In 1982, he was the youngest artist invited to participate in Documenta and in 1983 took part in the Whitney Biennial. Between 1982 and 1985, his work dealt with his uncertainties about black and Hispanic identity.

A close associate was with the Italian artist Francesco Clemente on several paintings and Andy Warhol with whom he collaborated on some works and with whom he painted in an atmosphere that was both intense and full of fun and good cheer. Basquiat was much in awe of Warhol's mastery of color and imagery, and Warhol was amazed at the ease with which Basquiat painted. After Warhol's death in 1987, Basquiat became reclusive and less productive.
Basquiat's large, colorful works combine the painting style of American abstract expressionism with diverse imagery. Cartoonish skeletons and dogs abound amid writing and thick swaths of color. His imagery of the early 1980s ranges from the lushly-painted skulls in Untitled (Skull) (1981, Eli and Edythe Broad Collection, Los Angeles, California) to more delicate tributes to sports and jazz heroes—sometimes little more than scrawled names, as in Discography (1983, Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, Zürich, Switzerland).


A major traveling retrospective of Basquiat's work was organized by the Whitney Museum in 1992.

"The only thing the market liked better than a hot young artist was a dead hot young artist, and it got one in Jean-Michel Basquiat, whose working life of about nine years was truncated by a heroin overdose at the age of twenty-seven. His career, both actual and posthumous, appealed to a cluster of toxic vulgarities. First, the racist idea of the black as naif or rhythmic innocent, and of the black artist as "instinctual," someone outside "mainstream" culture and therefore not to be rated in its terms: a wild pet for the recently cultivated collector. Second, a fetish about the freshness of youth, blooming among the discos of the East Side scene. Third, guilt and political correctness, which made curators and collectors nervous about judging the work of any black artist who could be presented as a "victim." Fourth, art-investment mania. And last, the audience's goggling appetite for self-destructive talent: Pollock, Montgomery Clift. All this gunk rolled into a sticky ball around Basquiat's tiny talent and produced a reputation.
"Basquiat's career was incubated by the short-lived graffiti movement, which started on the streets and subway cars in the early 1970s, peaked, fell out of view, began all over again in the 1980s, peaked again, and finally receded, leaving Basquiat and the amusingly facile Keith Haring as its only memorable exponents. Unlike Haring, however, Basquiat never tagged the subways. The son of middle-class Brooklyn parents, he had a precocious success with his paintings from the start. The key was not that they were "primitive," but that they were so arty. Stylistically, they were pastiches of older artists he admired: Cy Twombly, Jean Dubuffet. Having no art training, he never tried to deal with the real world through drawing; he could only scribble and jot, rehearsing his own stereotypes, his pictorial nouns for "face" or "body" over and over again. Consequently, though Basquiat's images look quite vivid and sharp at first sight, and though from time to time he could bring off an intriguing passage of spiky marks or a brisk clash of blaring color, the work quickly settles into the visual monotony of arid overstyling. Its relentless fortissimo is wearisome. Critics made much of Basquiat's use of sources: vagrant code-symbols, quotes from Leonardo or Gray's Anatomy, African bushman art or Egyptian murals. But these were so scattered, so lacking in plastic force or conceptual interest, that they seem mere browsing - homeless representation.
"The claims made for Basquiat were absurd and already seem like period pieces. 'Since slavery and oppression under white supremacy are visible subtexts in Basquiat's work ,' intoned one essayist in the catalog to his posthumous retrospective at the Whitney Museum, 'he is as close to Goya as American painting has ever produced.' Another extolled his 'punishing regime of self-abuse' as part of 'the disciplines imposed by the principle of inverse asceticism to which he was so resolutely committed.' Inverse asceticism, apparently, is PC-speak for addiction. There was much more in, so to speak, this vein. But the effort to promote Basquiat into an all-purpose inflatable martyr-figure, the Little Black Rimbaud of American painting, remains unconvincing." ...

(PLease Login to see the complete biography.)

Visit the Gallery!
Visit the Library!
Discover the Artists!
Loading...

The complete works of artists
Catalogue raisonne from artist
Our Catalogue Raisonne


Give a Gift Certificate

Gift Shop

Our Our eBay  Auctions Auctions


Currency Converter
Currency Converter Currency Converter Currency Converter
Currency Converter
Currency Converter Currency Converter Currency Converter Currency Converter
Currency Converter
 

Inventory | Classified Ads | Artist's Studio| Gift Certificates | Contact Us | About Us | Terms of Use
Member Services
| Links Page | Link To Us | Affiliate Program | Feedback | Customer Comments | Help
Use Your : Shop with Confidence -- all orders are protected by a full refund guarantee.
Copyright © Art-cadre.com A division of D&H Goossens. All rights reserved.
Phone&Fax +322/218-13-82, Quai au Foin 11, 1000 Brussels, Belgium.
With :