Art-Cadre.com
the source of fine art
Home Fine Art Jean-Michel Folon Salvador Dali Paul Delvaux
Buy Art | Search Artist | You're Looking for | You're Selling
Cart Wishlist Accessories Services
Visit the Gallery's Collection
 Mon 19 Nov Make Art-Cadre.com  My Home Page Add Art-Cadre.com to My Favorites English VersionEN | FRFrench Version
Log In | Newsletter| Help
Search Fine Art
Advanced search
Find exactly what you're looking for

Keyword Search:
Type in an item number, artist name or word
search tips

TOP 10 Artists
1 DELVAUX Paul
2 MAGRITTE Rene
3 FOLON Jean-Michel
4 DALI Salvador
5 FINI Leonor
6 Man RAY
7 CARZOU Jean
8 BRASILIER Andre
9 ICART Louis
10 DANCHIN Leon
 
Media (1809)
Graphics [966]
Drawings [20]
Paintings [21]
Art Jewelry [2]
Ceramics [16]
Sculptures [66]
Posters [189]
Miscellaneous [2]
Philately [10]
Art Books [517]

Search
Artists
Artists A to Z
Style classification
Thematic classification
Artist Biography
Glossary
Selling Art
Looking for Art
Novelties
Promotions
Newsletter
Links
LinkExchange
Affiliates
Affiliates
Affiliates
All Artists A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
ADAMI Valerio
AGAM Yaacov
ALECHINSKY Pierre
ALTMAN Harold
ANDIVERO Antonio
ANTONIO
APPEL Karel
ARBARETAZ Jean-Louis
ARMAN Fernandez
AVATI Mario
BAJ Enrico
BELLMER Hans
BEN (Benjamin VAUTIER)
BERROCAL Miguel
BERTRAN Andre
BEZ Jacqueline
BLANPAIN Jean-Pierre
BOGAERT Gaston
BONNARD Pierre
BONNEFOIT Alain
BRASILIER Andre
BRAYER Yves
BRILLANT Gilou
BRISSON Pierre-Marie
BUFFET Bernard
BURY Pol
CALDER Alexander
CARCAN Rene
CARZOU Jean
CATHELIN Bernard
CAVALLE Salvador
CESAR
CHAGALL Marc
COIGNARD James
CULPEPPER Joseph
DALI Salvador
DANCHIN Leon
De CHIRICO Giorgio
de KOONING Willem
de SAINT PHALLE Niki
DEBERDT Francoise
DEBUTLER Jacqueline
DEFOSSEZ Alfred
DEGANS Xavier
DELACROIX Eugene
DELAUNAY Robert
DELAUNAY Sonia
DELPORTE Charles
DELUCA Peter
DELVAUX Paul
DINE Jim
DONADINI Jean-Paul
DUPONT Michel
DUSSAU Georges
ENSOR James
ERNST Max
FAYET Marie-Therese
FINI Leonor
FITREMANN Gerard
FLAMENG Francois
FOLON Jean-Michel
FORT Esteve
FOUJITA Leonard
FULLA Prim
GANNE Yves
GANTNER Bernard
GAVEAU Claude
GLASER Milton
GOEZU Andre
GORODINE Alexis
GRANGER Michel
GREENHALF Robert
GRENIER Didier
GRIGOR Rachel Anne
GUIRAMAND Paul
HARING Keith
HARTUNG Hans
HASEGAWA Shoichi
HAUCK Bernd
HAUCK Norma C
HEBBELINCK Francis
HEBBELINCK Roger
HELENON Serge
HERGE
HILAIRE Camille
HILON France
HOSTALLERO Gary
HUNDERTWASSER Friedrich
HWANG Kyu-Baik
ICART Louis
IVANOV Alexander
JANSSEN Horst
KHNOPFF Fernand
KITSLAAR Hans
KLEE Paul
KOLLWITZ Kathe
KRAMER Mireille
KUHN Volker
LABISSE Felix
LANDUYT Octave
LAURENCIN Marie
LEGER Fernand
LICHTENSTEIN Roy
LINCKE Hartmut
LUBAROW Renee
LUCEBERT
MADUZAC
MAGRITTE Rene
Man RAY
MARA Pol
MARTIN Magdeleine
MASSON Andre
MIRO Joan
MOTHERWELL Robert
MUNCH Edvard
MUNOZ Lucio
NELLENS Roger
PANAMARENKO
PAPART Max
PARKER Karen
PEDERSEN Carl-Henning
PEYNET Raymond
PICASSO Pablo
PIERRON Georges
PIROTTE Suzanne
RAFFLEWSKI Rolf
RASSENFOSSE Armand
REMBRANDT
RIAB Boris
RIVERA Antonio
RIVERS Larry
ROBERT Laurent
RODO-BOULANGER Graciela
ROPS Felicien
SAINT CLAIR P
SCHNEUER David
SOMVILLE Roger
SOULAGES Pierre
SPAHN Victor
STERN Bernard
SZYMKOWICZ Charles
TANNING Dorothea
TAPIES Antoni
TATAFIORE Ernesto
THOMA Pierre
TING Walasse
TINGUELY Jean
TOBIASSE Theo
TOFFOLI Louis
TOULOUSE LAUTREC
TREMOIS Pierre-Yves
UBAC Raoul
UNKNOWN - INCONNU
URDIN Kiro
VALADIE Jean-Baptiste
VAN DONGEN Kees
VASARELY Victor
VILLON Jacques
WALKER Anne
WANG C C
WARE Martin
WEISBUCH Claude
WESSELMANN Tom
WUNDERLICH Paul
X Files
YVARAL Jean-Pierre
ZADKINE Ossip
ZANETTI Claire
ZAO WOU-KI
Joan MIRO
View this artist's available pieces here.
Spain
1893 - 1985
Surrealism
MIRO Joan

Spanish painter, ceramicist, sculptor and graphic artist born April 20,1893, in Barcelona. He died in Majorca, Spain, on December 25, 1983.
His surrealist works, with their subject matter drawn from the realm of memory and imaginative fantasy, are some of the most original of the 20th century.

After overcoming considerable opposition from his father- a goldsmith by trade- Miro studied at Francesco Gali's School of Art in Barcelona from 1912 onwards. His early pictures were landscapes and portraits in which elements of folk art are combined with expressive fauvist gestures.

In 1919 he moved to Paris and the early influences of Van Gogh and the Fauves were succeeded by Picasso and Cubism.
By 1923 he was a prominent member of the Surrealists and signed their manifesto in 1924. He was part of
the first Surrealist exhibition, which was staged in the Galerie Pierre in 1926. Around this time Miro began producing his linear, dreamlike compositions. When the Civil War broke out, Miro left Spain and began to
paint the frightful visions which fill his 'wild' pictures.

From the late 1920's he had begun producing a wide range of graphic works, Miró also experimented in a wide array of other media, devoting himself to etchings and lithographs for several years in the 1950s and also working in watercolor, pastel, collage, and paint on copper and masonite. In 1954 Miro was awarded the Grand Prix for graphic art at the Biennale in Venice. An artist of great wit and originality, Miro constantly explored forms and techniques in his graphic work. He used carborundum and resin painted directly on to the plate to build up a thick relief form on the metal. When printed, this creates a high impasto effect which adds depth and texture to the print. The rich blacks act as a foil to the bright colours wich become even stronger when placed next to them. As Miro once said "I want to hit the spectator with a straight right between the eyes before he has time for a second thought".

Between 1940 and 1941 Miro produced his 'Constellations'- a series of luminous gouaches on paper. These works depict man and nature, the earth and the cosmos.

From 1940 to 1948 Miro left France for Spain to escape the Second World War. During this time he produced his first ceramic pieces working in collaboration with the Spanish potter Llorens Artigas.

Between 1954 and 1959, he devoted himself almost exclusively to this medium. Whilst working on a commission for the UNESCO Building in Paris (Wall of the Moon and Wall of the Sun, 1957-59) and for Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., he developed an entirely new style of ceramic wall design.

Miró drew on memory, fantasy, and the irrational to create works of art that are visual analogues of surrealist poetry. These dreamlike visions, such as Harlequin's Carnival or Dutch Interior, often have a whimsical or humorous quality, containing images of playfully distorted animal forms, twisted organic shapes, and odd geometric constructions. The forms of his paintings are organized against flat neutral backgrounds and are painted in a limited range of bright colors, especially blue, red, yellow, green, and black. Amorphous amoebic shapes alternate with sharply drawn lines, spots, and curlicues, all positioned on the canvas with seeming nonchalance. Miró later produced highly generalized, ethereal works in which his organic forms and figures are reduced to abstract spots, lines, and bursts of colors.
He is one of the giants of twentieth-century art, and for many, one of its most spiritual artists. Miró’s fellow Catalonian, Antoni Tàpies, pointed to one of the keys of Miró’s greatness: "Miró offered us the continual, changing and infinite flux of nature; faced with immutable laws, he offered us the rhythms and spontaneous ebb and flow of the waves in a living world.... He showed us that we are all equal because we are all made from the stars themselves. He made the wretched see that they carried all the riches of the universe within themselves. He told us that, before things could grow bigger and better, love had to impregnate everything . . . that we ought to seek once more for the purity and innocence of the first day."
Tàpies is not the only one who holds Miró up as one of the essential artists of the twentieth century. It is becoming more and more clear that, as Michael Kimmelman suggests in his 1993 New York Times review of the Museum of Modern Art’s Centennial Miró show, the artist "gave free rein to an imagination that has no parallel in the history of art" and adds that "it gave to the world . . . an unforgettable and entirely original vein of comic and erotic fantasy." Kimmelman goes on to proclaim Miró the most "accessible painter among the great figures of twentieth-century art. . . . His paintings can be so joyous and hilarious that you laugh out loud in front of them. But they have their darker side, too, and the two sides of the artist’s imagination mixed."
In another New York Times piece, Hayden Herrera reminds us that in 1924, after Miró had discovered his own "formal language," Picasso told him that "he was the only artist after Picasso himself to have carried painting forward." Acclaimed as the "greatest surrealist of us all" by Andre Breton, hailed by Pierre Alechinsky as one of the chief inspirations of the COBRA movement, and acclaimed by critics like Clement Greenburg and Arthur C. Danto as the artist whose 1941 show at the Museum of Modern Art overwhelmed the New York painters who saw it because "it answered questions that were inchoately felt, namely how to make the next move." As Lee Krasner, one of the leading Abstract Expressionist painters and the wife of Jackson Pollock, put it, Miró’s paintings were "little miracles."

Barbara Rose perhaps best explains Miró’s importance when she notes, "Miró’s contribution to current painting is inestimable," and adds: "surrealist space, at least as it was developed by Miró, is open, expansive, indeterminate, as opposed to the closed, finite restrictive space of cubism, with its layered planes and silhouetted shapes. Surrealist space is as fluid as the thought process involved in the technique of free association that inspired surrealist automatism. Certainly it is no accident that the discovery of the unconscious, as well as man’s initial experiences in exploring atmospheric outer space, coincided with the conceptualization of a new kind of pictorial space that is both continuous and unbounded." ...

(PLease Login to see the complete biography.)

Visit the Gallery!
Visit the Library!
Discover the Artists!
Loading...

The complete works of artists
Catalogue raisonne from artist
Our Catalogue Raisonne


Give a Gift Certificate

Gift Shop

Our Our eBay  Auctions Auctions


Currency Converter
Currency Converter Currency Converter Currency Converter
Currency Converter
Currency Converter Currency Converter Currency Converter Currency Converter
Currency Converter
 

Inventory | Classified Ads | Artist's Studio| Gift Certificates | Contact Us | About Us | Terms of Use
Member Services
| Links Page | Link To Us | Affiliate Program | Feedback | Customer Comments | Help
Use Your : Shop with Confidence -- all orders are protected by a full refund guarantee.
Copyright © Art-cadre.com A division of D&H Goossens. All rights reserved.
Phone&Fax +322/218-13-82, Quai au Foin 11, 1000 Brussels, Belgium.
With :